Coolest Thing Ever!

The FIVB has just launched a new youtube channel aimed to showcase the history of the sport.  The first video they have uploaded is a clip from the 1964 Olympics, part of a match between the Soviet Union and Czechoslovakia.  It is very, very cool.

I have a question… How many rule changes and other (non technical) innovations can you pick up from the first five minutes of the clip?***

*** I count five seven rule changes and two innovations.

Advertisements

17 thoughts on “Coolest Thing Ever!

    1. markleb Post author

      Given that the Czechs actually invented the forearm pass, what is in this video is by definition the correct way to do it.

      Like

      Reply
  1. herrtrainer

    I am a bit disappointed that you found only five rule changes.
    There are lot of rule changes that are easy to find. Even if we take the rally-point-system and the implementation of the libero as your two innovations you can find more than five rule changes….

    Like

    Reply
  2. Ronny

    I am a bit disappointed that you found only five rule changes.
    There are lot of rule changes that are easy to find. Even if we take the rally-point-system and the implementation of the libero as your two innovations you can find more than five rule changes….

    Like

    Reply
    1. markleb Post author

      LOL I missed the obvious ones… I didn’t think about rally point or libero. That makes seven rule changes that I can think of.
      The innovations that I had in mind are to do with the presentation of the game.

      Like

      Reply
      1. markleb Post author

        You were right, Ronny… there are more. I ended up with seven rule changes you can see on the video, three you can’t, and five innovations.

        Rule changes in order…
        0:08 libero
        0:16 service zone
        0:41 block can’t penetrate over the net (there is a call for this at 9:40 and you can see if really clearly in the side view from the 11:30 mark)
        0:50 block still counts as first contact
        1:40 simultaneous contact is called as a replay
        1:45 double hit on first contact
        6:42 players can’t leave the court during a timeout
        + rally point, let service, net touch rule

        Innovations…
        – taraflex floor instead of wood
        – three ball system instead of one ball (you can see it for the first time at 0:30)
        – coloured ball instead of white ball
        – long sleeve playing shirts instead of short sleeved
        – knee pads

        I might have missed some. Did I?

        Like

      2. markleb Post author

        There are a couple of other interesting things…
        10:15 there is a windmill spike
        10:50 you can kind of see a ‘drive’ serve

        Like

      3. SA

        Another rule change; no setting of the serve?

        Innovations: Active Ankles? In fact, strapping tape in general?

        Like

  3. Ronny

    Did you see the exchange of players? (9:50) It seems that there was no routine for doing that. I do not know the exact rules for the exchange.
    Did you see that there were no antennae? (3:27) They came 1976, distance between these 9.40m. That is nice to see that the antenna is 20cm next to the side band.
    Did you see that the players were numbered from 1 up to 12?
    You were not allowed to play the ball with your feet.
    I think you were allowed to block the service (forbidden in 1982).

    At last I wish that your players do the windmill spike!

    Like

    Reply
    1. markleb Post author

      I can’t believe I didn’t notice there were no antenna!! I’ll blame the quality of the video 😉
      I noticed the substitution but didn’t really think of it as a rule change.
      I was thinking of distance between the lines on the net (antenna) but it didn’t look to me like they were outside the court.
      The feet and blocking the serve are also correct of course.
      Nice work!!!

      Like

      Reply
      1. Ronny

        The side bands were always directly above the side lines. So they always had the distance of 9.0 metres. But the antennae were when they were implemented 20cm next to the side band. It was made because of the rule when a ball is “in”. The ball was correctly played over the net when it touched the imaginary vertical side line, like the rule on the ground. After the Olympic Games in Montreal in 1976 the crossing space was narrowed to 9.0m and so the ball must be completely “in” when you play it over the net.
        You can see it here (2:30):

        Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s